Tie and Dye Printing Technique

 

 

One of the traditional methods of printing textiles in India is the Tie and Dye. It is interesting to note each pattern has a special significance. Some of the noteworthy patterns are chandokhni, shikhara, barah baag, and bavan baag.

Origin of Tie and Dye

If legends are to be believed then tie and dye developed in the State of Jaipur. However, the common belief states that it was brought to Kutch by Muslim Khatris from Sindh.

Bandhani was introduced in Jamnagar around 400 years ago and today is a leading center of Bandhani. The literary text of the Harshacharita refers to Bandhani. A bandhani garment is considered lucky for the bride.

Tie and Dye Technique

First the cloth is bleached and then folded into two or either four layers based on the thickness of the cloth. Designer called Rangara marks the layout of the pattern on the material using wooden blocks dipped in geru, a burnt sienna color mixed with water. Then a craftsman ties the cloth, which is not to be dyed. The folds of the material within the small motif are lifted and tied together.

The folds of the material within the small motif are lifted and tied together. Lipai technique is followed in Rajasthan.

Materials Required for Tie and dye Technique

Muslin, handloom or silk cloth, thread, starch, colors, wooden blocks are the commonly used for bandhni.